Ply: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Ply: a free lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Ply, suggested by Natasha on Patreon. Many knitters will know that plied yarn is yarn where two or more strands of yarn have been twisted around each other. (The word ply comes from the French for to bend.) It was entirely accidental that the columns of lace look rather like plied yarn, but it makes me happy.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make two of these into knitting stitches each month: the first is drawn from the collection of new words; the second is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

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Candle Flames: a free cable knitting stitch pattern

Candle Flames: a cable knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

Sometimes when I design a stitch pattern, I see a motif that I want to play with a bit more. Ply, from last week,  has a motif that reminded me of a candle flame. When I pulled it out of the larger stitch pattern, it was easier to turn the decrease lines into cable stitches, and here we are. (Note: this doesn’t count as secret code anymore because it’s missing most of the yarnovers from the original word.)

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Rune: a free cable knitting stitch pattern

The first word I encoded for Patreon this month was Rune, suggested by Catnach on Patreon. Sometimes I make an extra cable design from the encoded word (when it’s a short enough word); this is one of those times.

I ran out of time to knit a swatch for this post. I still hope to do so, but in the meantime, I’ve included the colored-in cable chart I made to make sure I’d put the cable crosses in the right directions. I’ve applied a photo filter on top to make it look a bit better.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make two of these into knitting stitches each month: the first is drawn from the collection of new words; the second is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose this, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The charts are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

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Railroad Tracks: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Railroad Tracks: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

This is the final result from my étude post last week. I am not sure everyone technically would call it lace, but it fits my personal definition. (It’s got deliberate holes in it.) It does have something to be remembered on every row, so if you prefer stitch patterns with rest rows, this isn’t for you. It’s otherwise pretty straightforward once you’re familiar with the bunny ears decrease. Columns of alternating YOs and decreases march up the fabric with reverse stockinette stitch between.

Feel free to change how many plain stitches are in the stockinette sections, or even make them wider and insert some other vertical lace design inside!

For best effect, don’t stretch it a lot when pinning it out. I stretched it vertically more than horizontally.

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Rune: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Rune: a free lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The first word for this month is rune, suggested by Catnach on Patreon. I’ve been interested in runes in a mild way since reading Tolkien as a child, and I’ve always found the angular letters interesting to look at. My lace is not so angular, but I’m particularly fond of the way this one came out!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make two of these into knitting stitches each month: the first is drawn from the collection of new words; the second is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose this, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The charts are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

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Étude no 23: noodling around a little with bunny ears back

Periodically I like to play with techniques in swatches to see what I can do with them. When I write about this, I call the posts my études, because they’re somewhat like the exercises musicians do for practicing.

This time I was looking at a potential chart for one of my Patreon words, and wondering if I could make something work. I had an idea about a combination to try and I decided to make a swatchlet to see.

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Charting mosaic knitting in StitchMastery

It occurs to me that it might be helpful (for other designers at least) to explain how I use my chart software to make mosaic knitting charts. For one thing, while there is a mosaic knitting format built into StitchMastery, it isn’t the one I personally prefer, so I do some extra editing to make my charts in the Barbara Walker format.

This is not a post about how to design mosaic knitting stitches; it is a post about how to produce a particular kind of chart format in the StitchMastery software. I don’t know enough about other knitting chart software to know how the methods translate.

I also use vector graphics art software for some of the final editing on these charts. Some major examples of this kind of software include Adobe Illustrator (subscription software), Inkscape (free and open source), Affinity Designer (this is what I use on our desktop computer). I usually prefer using Graphic for iOS. (They also have a version for MacOS which I have not tried.)

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Pegasus: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Pegasus: a free lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Pegasus, suggested by Bonnie on Patreon. Pegasus was one of my favorite mythological animals when I was a child, so it’s nice to revisit those memories.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make two of these into knitting stitches each month: the first is drawn from the collection of new words; the second is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

Continue reading