Gritty: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Gritty: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

This month, the random number generator chose gritty, suggested by Natasha. I think we can all use a little determination right about now.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. A random number generator helps me choose the word of the month, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

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Some swatches for my secret code rewrite

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Just a small blog post this week. I’ve been rewriting my basic instructions for how to design secret patterns based on words. I knit these three swatches to go with the post about turning a code grid into a stitch pattern. While I love the lace designs I made from code grids, I also really like some of the possibilities with other kinds of stitch patterns. One shows the grid as colorwork, one turns it into a knit-purl pattern, and one shows it with slipped stitches with the yarn carried in front. 

This is two repeats of each Peace chart from side to side. I worked two and a half repeats of the knit purl chart vertically, stopping after row 3. I then started working the slipped stitch chart from row 4 (to continue the code pattern smoothly), and worked two and a half repeats of that chart.

I am considering reknitting this one to be tidier. I should have made a plain border at the bottom; I think that would have helped me get the gauge right from the start. I think I might also do the pattern stitches on rows 1&4 with duplicate stitch. This is two repeats of the Peace grid horizontally, and two and a half vertically, ending after a row 3. 

I have some other swatches to knit for that post, too. 

Persist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Persist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

I published two stitch patterns for the word Resist a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve done the same for Persist. I converted the letters of Persist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a lace chart. There is also a chart for stranded knitting at the end of the post.

The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it necessarily meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you.

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Three 2-to-3 increases

Three 2-to-3 increases

Christine Guest has been posting an interesting set of round ups about double increases, and in it she made a challenge to create a corresponding increase to the 3-to-2 decrease that’s also known as Bunny Ears Back.

A side note – the Stitch Maps system now has that decrease as an option. This blog post shows two stitch patterns using that technique – I really like the Little Hearts stitch pattern in particular.

Anyway! So my mind immediately started turning over the question of a symmetrical 2-to-3 increase. In some sense, the obvious thing is just two stitches with an increase in between: lifted increases, a YO, or the kind of m1 that involves lifting a bar. But if you don’t want a hole, you have to twist the increase. I am generally happy enough with the invisibility of lifted increases and don’t worry about their asymmetricality.

Still, I’m always up for challenges like this. Even if I don’t succeed, I often find interesting things along the way. I tried out three different methods that I think could genuinely be called 2-to-3 increases.

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Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

I published a chart for the word Resist converted to stranded knitting a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve got the lace version ready. I converted the letters of Resist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a chart. (The lace is based on a different chart from the stranded knitting.)

The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it necessarily meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you.

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Turning a code grid into a stitch pattern

It’s been a while since I took a break from rewriting my basic instructions on turning words into stitch patterns. This is the next in the sequence; once I’ve written everything up, I’ll update the old version.

You might be asking yourself how to turn a code grid into a stitch pattern after choosing a layout.

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Resist: a free chart for stranded knitting and other crafts

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On Saturday I went to the nearest Women’s March; not the one in Washington, DC. It was a moving experience, and it derailed my plans for today’s blog post.

Below, you’ll find a chart for stranded knitting based on the word Resist. I turned the letters into numbers, and then charted the numbers to make this pattern. The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you. Here is a lace version of Resist.

(Added later) If you’d like more overt signs of resistance, here’s some patterns for you:

  • PussyHat Project,including patterns for knit, crochet, and sewn hats. You could probably adjust the pussyhat to use my stitch pattern, if you liked.
  • Resist hat from Donna Druchunas’s free ebook, Knitting as a Political Act, which includes links to other designers’ work as well.

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Linkety-link, part 20

It’s been a while since I did a link round-up!

Knitted Borders and Corners – some different ways of approaching corners when working a knitted-on border.

Learning, Practicing, Perfecting – Sara Lamb writes here about the learning process in respect to weaving and leatherwork, but the process itself is universal to handcraft. Well worth reading.

Non-roll Stocking Stitch Edge? – well, not exactly. This post tells how to use twined knitting to make what looks like a stockinette hem that won’t curl.

Bunny ears decreases– I’ve talked a little about the 3-to-2 decrease I like to use, that some people call Bunny Ears Back. It produces a symmetrical single decrease that doesn’t appear to lean to either side. They are now accounted for in Stitch Maps, which makes me happy. The linked blog post also shows a couple of stitch patterns making use of them – I really like Little Hearts a lot and am planning on making use of it. A more complex stitch pattern of mine that uses them is Beloved – and I can see that I’ll need to go edit the stitch map!

Taming long floats via the STUART method for color-knitting – an intriguing trick from TECHknitter (so many of her tricks are intriguing) for dealing with long floats. This looks like it might be the key for knitting more of my code grids as colorwork even with long floats. Hm!