Brouhaha: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Brouhaha: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

July’s stitch pattern word is brouhaha, suggested by Hazel on Patreon.

I like the way the word sounds, sort of round and unusual. (It was suggested at the beginning of June. Any similarity to current events is purely coincidental!)

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. A random number generator helps me choose the word of the month, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

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Laying out the numbers on a rectangular grid: method 4

Peace method 4 6 columns

This is the next part of my rewrite of my instructions for turning words into knitting charts (or charts for other crafts). Once the letters have been turned into numbers, they need to be charted on a grid. I already posted three ways of making rectangular grids with the numbers; this is the fourth way.

This is the method I tend to use most often for my lace stitch patterns, though it varies from word to word.

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Crescent shawl selvedges

Crescent shawl selvedge variations

One of the  common forms of knitted crescent shawls involves casting on a few stitches in the center top of the shawl, and then knitting back and forth while increasing three stitches on each side over every two rows.

The selvedges I’ve seen most frequently are in two parts: there’s a two stitch garter selvedge on the outside edges, and the increases take place just inside. There’s a pretty standard recipe for this that results in pretty large holes at the edge. These look great in some circumstances, but I don’t think they’re always right for any given crescent shawl. I’m sure other people have come up with variations, but here’s a couple of my own. Feel free to use them however you like.

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Laying out the numbers on a rectangular grid: methods 1-3

peace method 1

This is the next part of my rewrite of my instructions for turning words into knitting charts (or charts for other crafts). Once the letters have been turned into numbers, they need to be charted on a grid. These are three ways of making rectangular grids with the numbers; I’ll post a fourth way in a couple of weeks. Continue reading

Doubles: a free knitting stitch pattern

Doubles: a free knitting stitch pattern.

When I was playing around with Apple Blossom and Scarab, this design came to mind as a possibility, and indeed it works. It’s a chevron pattern taken to the smallest extreme I can think of, though the chevron part isn’t terribly visible. The Doubles stitch pattern consists of nothing but double decreases and double increases, except for the edge stitches.

This makes a nice set of vertical lines, resembling a rib.

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Embedding words in knitting rewrite, part 1

Peace ribbing 1: a simple way to turn an encoded word into knitting

A few months ago I proposed a rewrite of my secret code pages because they’re a little disorganized and confusing for many people. It doesn’t help that I tacked on some extra content in places that it didn’t really fit. Anyway, I think it needs doing.

I’m going to post the drafts as blog posts before changing the originals. Please feel free to tell me if anything is confusing!

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Throwback Thursday: knitting circle math

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About six years ago, I posted about how to calculate the percentage of a circle that’s been knit, based on how many rounds have been worked. I’ve updated the post a little bit while I was at it.

Shorter version: starting from the center of a circle, a quarter of the yarn will have been knit at half the rounds. Half the yarn will have been knit at about 70% of the rounds.

This also works for other shapes that start with a small number of stitches and increase at a steady rate.

I don’t know that this works for pi shawls.

(How have I been blogging for six years?)