Heatwave: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Heatwave: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

August’s stitch pattern word is heatwave, suggested by Susan on Patreon.

I’m really pleased with the way this one came out. I encoded each of the words heat and wave separately in the same size template, and then stacked them on top of each other to design the lace. I think each word should work as a separate stitch pattern, though I ran out of time to swatch them.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. A random number generator helps me choose the word of the month, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

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A final note on reflection in symmetry

final chart for peace 1

The kinds of chart layouts produced by reflective symmetry (as described in my last post on the topic) can make the columns along the line of symmetry look a bit clunky. This post explains a way to fix that. If you find anything confusing about it, I would very much appreciate it if you told me!

This is part of my rewrite of the instructions for how to embed words as stitch patterns.

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Designs using my stitch patterns

It occurs to me to mention that I have a bundle on Ravelry that lists all the patterns I know of that use my stitch patterns: Naomi’s stitch patterns in use. So far, it’s just nine patterns, but I know of four more that will be coming in the next few months.

If you have a Ravelry account, you can click the “add to favorites” button on the bundle to find it easily in the future.

Here’s a screenshot of what you’ll find right now (see bundle for working links):

screenshot of patterns currently in pattern bundle

 

Étude no. 15: permutations

3-stitch lace permutations: some free stitch patterns and how to roll them up with dice

I’m designing a pattern which needs a little simple lace in a multiple of 3 stitches at the beginning. I didn’t want a secret code lace. I wanted a multiple of 2, 4, 6, or 12 rows. In the end, I used simple diagonal lines because it flowed nicely with the other lace in the design. But I was struck by the scarcity of basic lace patterns in multiples of three in the places I was looking..

Suddenly it occurred to me that with only three stitches in a row, the most basic lace would have one knit stitch, one decrease, and one yarnover per row. This essentially makes for six permutations for a given row. (I simplified matters by pretending that all decreases are the same.)

six permutations of three stitches

Mathematically speaking, this means that there ought to be 6 possible two-row lace patterns with these three stitches (including a plain alternating row), 36 possible four-row patterns, and 216 possible six-row lace patterns. Obviously they won’t all be nice, though fiddling with changing which way the decreases lean helps a lot.

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Charted numbers and symmetries

peace offset

I’m gradually rewriting my knitting “secret code” posts. I’m publishing the new versions as blog posts. This is the next in the sequence; once I’ve written everything up, I’ll update the old version.

Once I’ve charted the numbers onto a grid, my next task is to figure out how to arrange the grid for my stitch pattern. This usually involves playing with symmetries.

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Laying out the numbers on a rectangular grid: method 4

Peace method 4 6 columns

This is the next part of my rewrite of my instructions for turning words into knitting charts (or charts for other crafts). Once the letters have been turned into numbers, they need to be charted on a grid. I already posted three ways of making rectangular grids with the numbers; this is the fourth way.

This is the method I tend to use most often for my lace stitch patterns, though it varies from word to word.

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Crescent shawl selvedges

Crescent shawl selvedge variations

One of the  common forms of knitted crescent shawls involves casting on a few stitches in the center top of the shawl, and then knitting back and forth while increasing three stitches on each side over every two rows.

The selvedges I’ve seen most frequently are in two parts: there’s a two stitch garter selvedge on the outside edges, and the increases take place just inside. There’s a pretty standard recipe for this that results in pretty large holes at the edge. These look great in some circumstances, but I don’t think they’re always right for any given crescent shawl. I’m sure other people have come up with variations, but here’s a couple of my own. Feel free to use them however you like.

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Laying out the numbers on a rectangular grid: methods 1-3

peace method 1

This is the next part of my rewrite of my instructions for turning words into knitting charts (or charts for other crafts). Once the letters have been turned into numbers, they need to be charted on a grid. These are three ways of making rectangular grids with the numbers; I’ll post a fourth way in a couple of weeks. Continue reading