Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

I published a chart for the word Resist converted to stranded knitting a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve got the lace version ready. I converted the letters of Resist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a chart. (The lace is based on a different chart from the stranded knitting.)

The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it necessarily meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you.

Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Notes:

  • This is a stitch pattern such as might be found in a stitch dictionary. It is not a pattern for a finished object.
  • Resist is a multiple of 16 stitches and 20 rows.
  • Rows 11-20 are the same as rows 1-10, offset horizontally by eight stitches.
  • Purl all wrong-side rows, working (k1, p1) in each double yarnover
  • I’ve made a stitch map for it.
  • Designers, please feel free to use this stitch in your patterns. I’d like credit but won’t be offended if people don’t give it.
  • If you like this stitch pattern, please donate to the SPLC, the ACLU, or whichever of the many civil rights organizations working to help people you prefer.

Abbreviations:

  • 1/1 LC: Slip next stitch to cable needle and place at front of work, knit 1, then knit 1 from cable needle.
  • 1/1 RC: Slip next stitch to cable needle and place at back of work, knit 1, then knit 1 from cable needle.
  • k: knit.
  • k2tog: knit 2 stitches together as if they were 1. (Right-leaning decrease)
  • k3tog: knit 3 stitches together as if they were 1. (Right-leaning double decrease)
  • p: purl.
  • ssk: slip each of the next 2 stitches as if to knit, then knit them together through the back loop. (Left-leaning decrease)
  • sssk: slip each of the next 3 stitches as if to knit, then knit them together through the back loop. (Left-leaning double decrease)
  • yo: yarnover.

Row 1 (RS): *k1, ssk, yo, k1, (ssk, yo x 2, k2tog) x 2, k1, yo, k2tog, k1; work from *.
Row 2 (WS): *p5, (k1, p1) in double yo, p2, (k1, p1) in double yo, p5; work from *.
Row 3: *k1, 1/1 LC, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, yo x 2, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, 1/1 RC, k1; work from *.
Row 4: *p7, (k1, p1) in double yo, p7; work from *.
Row 5: *k2, k2tog, yo, k3tog, yo, k1, yo x 2, k1, yo, sssk, yo, ssk, k2; work from *.
Row 6: *p7, (k1, p1) in double yo, p7; work from *.
Row 7: *k1, (k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk) x 2, k1; work from *.
Row 8: purl.
Row 9: *k2tog, yo, k4, yo, k2tog, ssk, yo, k4, yo, ssk; work from *.
Row 10: purl.
Row 11: *ssk, yo x 2, k2tog, k1, yo, k2tog, k2, ssk, yo, k1, ssk, yo x 2, k2tog; work from *.
Row 12: *p1, (k1, p1) in double yo, p10, (k1, p1) in double yo, p1; work from *.
Row 13: *yo, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, 1/1 RC, k2, 1/1 LC, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, yo; work from *.
Row 14: (If just working one repeat – purl across.) p15, *(k1, p1) in double yo; work from *, end p15.
Row 15: *yo, k1, yo, sssk, yo, ssk, k4, k2tog, yo, k3tog, yo, k1, yo; work from *.
Row 16: (If just working one repeat – purl across.) p15, *(k1, p1) in double yo; work from *, end p15.
Row 17: *k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk; work from *.
Row 18: purl.
Row 19: *ssk, yo, k4, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k4, yo, k2tog; work from *.
Row 20: purl.

Charting process:

None of the charts I made from encoding Resist for stranded knitting appealed to me for lace, so I started fresh. I took the letters of Resist and encoded them in base 8: 22 05 23 11 23 24. I took those numbers and charted them in various ways on grids. Here is the grid I thought would work best for lace:

resist-lace-process-1

Here’s how it works. I started in the bottom right corner, because so does knitting. The first digit of resist in base 8 is 2, so I counted two squares. Then I marked the next square to the left in black. The next digit is 2, so I counted another two squares then marked the next square. The third digit is zero, so I counted no squares and marked the next square to the left. The fourth digit is 5: I counted one square, then ran out of space, so I counted the remaining four squares on the next row, working from right to left. I continued the process until I was done counting digits. It doesn’t matter that the last square is blank, because there’s not a black square to its left; this shows that it’s not part of the code.

resist-lace-process-2

I mirrored the result.

resist-lace-process-3

Then I placed another copy of the mirrored result above the first repeat, offset by half.

Finally, I replaced all the black squares with YOs, made a guess about where to place the decreases, and then spent a lot of time swatching until I got things right.

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7 thoughts on “Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

    1. Thank you!

      No, I don’t. I don’t really have anything against the idea. But first, I’m not out in public much, and second, I have twice been in situations where I had to gather the courage to deal with a stranger bullying another stranger. I did it, but a safety pin would have frankly been no use in those situations, except to remind me to do something. The people being bullied were either focused on the bully or focused on not looking at anyone because of shame.

      I was able to do something without the reminder, so. It’s also the sort of thing I’d have trouble remembering to add to my clothes each day.

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