All posts by Naomi Parkhurst

I call myself a string geek because I like doing a whole range of hand crafts, most of which involve string or yarn: knitting, spinning, sewing, nalbinding, crochet, embroidery, tatting, dyeing, and probably some I'm not even thinking of.

Osprey: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Osprey from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Enting and Bookwyrm, two of my Patreon supporters.

I developed a lace stitch pattern for Osprey but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting. This has a float that is a little longer than I’d like, but TECHknitter has a method to tame them.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Osprey: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Osprey, suggested by Enting and Bookwyrm, two of my Patreon supporters.

I’ve already made a stitch pattern with the leaf motif that shows up in Osprey; it doesn’t quite match up in terms of the stitch repeat, but Cariad Leaf could be modified to suit, I think. Also, I *think* Osprey and Cariad could maybe work in the same design? I’d have to chart it out to be sure, but it’s worth a try.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made an Osprey needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Verve: a mosaic knitting chart

A while back, I encoded the word Verve and made it into a lace stitch pattern and a needlework chart. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts and instructions

Peach: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Peach from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Cathy D, one of my Patreon supporters.

I developed a knitted lace stitch pattern for Peach, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting. Peach has floats that are a little longer than I’d like, but TECHknitter has a method to tame them.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Peach: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Peach, suggested by Cathy D, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Peach needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Little Flying Birds: a needlework chart for any craft

I found this motif in a chart I was working with, and I like it a lot. It’s simple enough that I daresay I’m not the first person to come up with this border pattern, but I just want to make sure. It reminds me of birds flying.

Follow link for charts and more information

Verve: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Verve from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Kate, one of my Patreon supporters.

I developed a lace stitch pattern for Verve, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Verve: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Verve, suggested by Kate, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Verve needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Converting a (specific) needlework chart to a mosaic knitting chart

I ended my post about figuring out whether a chart works as a mosaic knitting with a chart that didn’t work for mosaic knitting. However, I wondered if it could somehow be altered to be feasible.

This post is about the process of making it work.

Continue reading Converting a (specific) needlework chart to a mosaic knitting chart

Weaving drafts and other things to do with encoding the word “weave”

When the random number generator pulled the word weave out of the Patreon suggestion pool, I knew at once that I wanted to include a weaving blog post for it.

I’m going to include various possibilities, with some help from a more experienced weaver. I’m still a beginning weaver myself and making weaving drafts is still mostly a mystery to me.

Continue reading Weaving drafts and other things to do with encoding the word “weave”