Idyll: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Idyll, suggested by Kate, a Patreon supporter. I think we could all use an idyll right about now. Peace, and rest, and beautiful surroundings. Or at least, that’s how I’ve always thought of idylls.

I decided to look it up, and it turns out that an idyll is a poem or song that describes a peaceful episode in the countryside, often idealized and unrealistic. A romanticized view of country life, in other words. Ah, well. A peaceful episode in the country still sounds comforting right now.

To return to knitting, I can’t tell if I’m just currently obsessed with the bunny ears yarnover, but I think it’s going to be useful in a fair number of code lace layouts that I would otherwise have decided were impossible. I’m using it enough that I’ve started to abbreviate it instead of writing it out in the instructions. Also, this design introduces the alternate form that’s based on bunny ears back, because of the way the decrease lines need to go. Both forms are there, so watch the chart symbols and abbreviations carefully!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Flying Birds: a knitting stitch pattern

I took the chart from Scattered Tulips, condensed it, and ended up with the chart below. When I knitted it, it came out with a satisfyingly thick, open texture. I haven’t tried it with variegated yarn yet, but my suspicion is that it would work very well indeed with this structure.

I get a vague impression of flying birds when I look at this one. There’s another view of this stitch pattern from the side at the bottom of the post.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and instructions

Scattered Tulips: a knitted stitch pattern

This is the first of the stitch pattern ideas I mentioned in the blog post about Bunny Ears yarnovers. It’s the first one I tried, and I like it a lot. It’s a classic layout for motifs, so I figured it would probably look good, but I wasn’t sure how it would look with lots of plain stockinette as the background.

Thanks go to my twitter followers for helping me come up with the name. There were a lot of ideas, but the vast majority of people saw tulips in it, so here we are.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Continue reading Scattered Tulips: a knitted stitch pattern

Icicle: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Icicle, suggested by Cathy, a Patreon supporter. I like all my code lace, but I like some results better than others. This one makes me very happy indeed!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Icicle: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Icicle from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Cathy, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Bunny Ears Yarnover

Back when I unvented* the bunny ears back decrease (I’m using the name that another unventor came up with because it seems to be somewhat standard by now), I thought about trying a variant with a yarnover in the middle, but never got around to it.

However, I finally had reason to try it out with the regular bunny ears decrease variant, for my Smile lace. I thought it would be good to write up the result in more detail in a blog post by itself, because I know myself well enough to know that I’m about to embark on playing with it to make other stitch patterns. (There are already ideas lurking in the back of my head.)

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Instructions and also musing on perfection

Spark: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Spark from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Bonnie C, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Spark: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is spark, suggested by Bonnie C, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Administrative update

My patterns are no longer available for sale on Ravelry, but they can be purchased on either Payhip or Gumroad. This page on my blog has a complete list.

One of my next projects is to use the tutorials that Sarah Bradberry posted to make the CSS on my Payhip shop as much more accessible as possible for the moment. Furthermore, she’s asked them to make the site more accessible and they were quite positive in their reply. That’s good news!

More later!

Rest: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern

A while back, I encoded the word Rest and made it into a lace stitch pattern and a needlework chart. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

It’s pretty rare that I have opinions about what yarn might be best with my stitch patterns, but I think this one might be good for alternating the two ends of yarns like Kauni Effektgarn, Knit Picks Chroma, or other yarns with long color shifts.

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts and instructions

knitting, crochet, other string tricks, and forays into other creative endeavors

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