Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

Resist: a free lace knitting stitch pattern

I published a chart for the word Resist converted to stranded knitting a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve got the lace version ready. I converted the letters of Resist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a chart. (The lace is based on a different chart from the stranded knitting.)

The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it necessarily meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you.

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Turning a code grid into a stitch pattern

It’s been a while since I took a break from rewriting my basic instructions on turning words into stitch patterns. This is the next in the sequence; once I’ve written everything up, I’ll update the old version.

You might be asking yourself how to turn a code grid into a stitch pattern after choosing a layout.

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Resist: a free chart for stranded knitting and other crafts

On Saturday I went to the nearest Women’s March; not the one in Washington, DC. It was a moving experience, and it derailed my plans for today’s blog post.

Below, you’ll find a chart for stranded knitting based on the word Resist. I turned the letters into numbers, and then charted the numbers to make this pattern. The result isn’t exactly secret code, nor is it meant to be recognized by other people as a sign of your political affiliations. But if you want to make something you can wear unobtrusively as a reminder to  yourself, this is a stitch pattern for you. Here is a lace version of Resist.

(Added later) If you’d like more overt signs of resistance, here’s some patterns for you:

  • PussyHat Project,including patterns for knit, crochet, and sewn hats. You could probably adjust the pussyhat to use my stitch pattern, if you liked.
  • Resist hat from Donna Druchunas’s free ebook, Knitting as a Political Act, which includes links to other designers’ work as well.

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Linkety-link, part 20

It’s been a while since I did a link round-up!

Knitted Borders and Corners – some different ways of approaching corners when working a knitted-on border.

Learning, Practicing, Perfecting – Sara Lamb writes here about the learning process in respect to weaving and leatherwork, but the process itself is universal to handcraft. Well worth reading.

Non-roll Stocking Stitch Edge? – well, not exactly. This post tells how to use twined knitting to make what looks like a stockinette hem that won’t curl.

Bunny ears decreases– I’ve talked a little about the 3-to-2 decrease I like to use, that some people call Bunny Ears Back. It produces a symmetrical single decrease that doesn’t appear to lean to either side. They are now accounted for in Stitch Maps, which makes me happy. The linked blog post also shows a couple of stitch patterns making use of them – I really like Little Hearts a lot and am planning on making use of it. A more complex stitch pattern of mine that uses them is Beloved – and I can see that I’ll need to go edit the stitch map!

Taming long floats via the STUART method for color-knitting – an intriguing trick from TECHknitter (so many of her tricks are intriguing) for dealing with long floats. This looks like it might be the key for knitting more of my code grids as colorwork even with long floats. Hm!

Three row mesh: a free knitting stitch pattern

The 2017 stitch pattern had me thinking about stitch patterns with three row repeats. There are some out there, but I don’t know why there’s not more. Anyway, here’s a stitch pattern I thought of because of 2017. It’s entirely possible that I’m not the first to come up with it.

It’s reversible, geometric, and it won’t curl because it’s got a garter stitch base to it. It should work  well with some variegated yarn because of that. Added selvedges are unnecessary.
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2017: a free garter lace stitch pattern

2017: a free garter lace knitting stitch pattern

After two years of making a stitch pattern from the digits of the new year, I decided to keep going. This one is a bit different from my usual lace – because of the placement of the yarnovers, I decided not to add extra plain rows. This is reversible garter lace, but not terribly tricky.

As some of my stitches do, it reminds me of plant cells under a microscope. I like it as a serviceable, reversible, non-curly, basic stitch pattern; it’s nothing spectacular.

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