Happy Tau Day!

Tau Day stitch pattern

Just for the fun of it, I’m going to post occasional stitch patterns in honor of geeky days on the calendar.

So what is Tau Day? Tau is a constant twice as big as pi, and it is apparently more useful than the number pi. Here is the Tau Manifesto for your mathematical pleasure. The main thing for my purposes is that 6/28 is a date that approximates Tau.

Therefore, I have encoded 628 as charts for lace knitting, knitted cables, and a grid for use in any craft that can use a grid as instructions. (This is not, of course, all of Tau; it just seemed like a useful stopping point.

Continue reading

Autumn is here (free cable stitch pattern, secret code)

"Autumn" encoded as a cable (free stitch pattern)

With the arrival of the autumnal equinox, I’ve made a cable chart for knitters and a generic chart for use in a variety of crafts. The former was encoded in base 6 and the latter in base 3.

It’s been a while since I did a secret code cable chart; the last one I tried just wouldn’t work out whatever I tried. I got discouraged.

Fall made me not want to do lace, though. Cables seemed more the thing, so I looked through all the grids I made for autumn and realized that this one would work.

The first yarn that came to hand is in rather a wintery color. Oh, well.

I didn’t swatch the generic chart this time; it’s not too hard to see how it looks, though:
three of four seasons encoded as a chart for crafts.

(Click images to enlarge.)

Continue reading

Serendipity

Serendipity (two free secret code stitch patterns)

Yes, it’s a double-post day! I post every week, but my Patreon-funded posts are extra. The first of the month falls on a Monday this month, so two posts it is.

One of my patrons requested that I make stitch patterns for the word serendipity, so here we are! (If you subscribe, you may also make such requests; I take one a month.)

Continue reading

recent stitch patterns

I’m not going to be selling patterns for any of my recent projects, but I thought I’d share the instructions for the stitch patterns.

First, the cable from my sweater (which I’m still working on):

Image

Here’s the chart and the instructions. Please note that Row Zero is a setup row, not included in the repeat.

Image

(Instructions are for knitting flat)

Row 0 (WS): k4, [p tbl] x 4, k4.
Row 1 (RS): p3, 1/1 RPC, [k tbl] x 2, 1/1 LPC, p3.
Row 2 (WS): k2, 1/1 LPC, k, [p tbl] x 2, k, 1/1 RPC, k2.
Row 3 (RS): p, 1/1 RPC, p2, [k tbl] x 2, p2, 1/1 LPC, p.
Row 4 (WS): k, p tbl, k2, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, k2, p tbl, k.
Row 5 (RS): p, k tbl, p, 1/1 RPC, p2, 1/1 LPC, p, k tbl, p.
Row 6 (WS): k, p tbl, 1/1 LPC, k, [k tbl] x 2, k, 1/1 RPC, p tbl, k.
Row 7 (RS): p, 1/1 RC, p2, [p tbl] x 2, p2, 1/1 LC, p.
Row 8 (WS): k, p tbl, 1/1 RPC, k, [k tbl] x 2, k, 1/1 LPC, p tbl, k.
Row 9 (RS): p, k tbl, p, 1/1 LPC, [p tbl] x 2, 1/1 RPC, p, k tbl, p.
Row 10 (WS): k, p tbl, k2, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, k2, p tbl, k.
Row 11 (RS): p, 1/1 LPC, p2, [k tbl] x 2, p2, 1/1 RPC, p.
Row 12 (WS): k2, 1/1 RPC, k, [p tbl] x 2, k, 1/1 LPC, k2.
Row 13 (RS): p3, 1/1 LPC, [k tbl] x 2, 1/1 RPC, p3.
Row 14 (WS): k4, 1/1 LC, 1/1 RC, k4.

(Note: this is, I think, a fairly standard Bavarian traveling stitch. I’ve seen similar things elsewhere, at any rate. I modified the one from the Twist of Fate sock pattern I found on Ravelry.)

 

Secondly, the rib from the socks I’m working on. This ribbing is a standard variation; so far as I know, it doesn’t have a name. I like the vertical column of garter stitch; I think it adds a nice bit of texture.

Image

Image

(Instructions are for knitting in the round)

Round 1: (p, k) x 2, p.
Round 2: p, k3, p.

Happy knitting!

Cables

(This is part of a series of posts on different ways of hiding meaning in your knitting.)

Table of Contents: Embedding meaning in Your Knitting | Converting Words to Numbers | Making a grid | Asymmetry or Symmetry? | Converting grids into stitch patterns | Lace | Cables | Other Encodings | Summary of My Method | Addendum: Ribbing | Further Resources

As with my post on lace, I’m not going to go into a great deal of detail about my design process. Among other things, I’m not sure I have a clear enough conscious grasp of how I do it—yet. Maybe someday. In the meantime, I can only suggest copious swatching and trying things out. Even failed attempts will teach you things about design.

Cables

For cables or twisted stitches, each square on the grid should be thought of as taking up multiple rows and stitches, so that it outlines a crossing and the minimum vertical space before the next crossing should happen. For cables, you’ll want the cells from the grid to be at least four stitches across and four rows vertically—the cross from a marked cell will happen on just one of those rows. Twisted stitches require at least two cells horizontally and vertically.

Original grid followed by the subdivided grid

Chart Symbols & Abbreviations:

knit symbol k knit
purl symbol p Purl.
RT Cross the 2nd st in front of 1st st, knit the 2nd st, then knit the 1st.
LT Cross the 2nd st behind the 1st st, knit the 2nd st, then knit the 1st.
RT with the back stitch purled. Cross the second stitch in front of the first and knit it; purl the first stitch; take both stitches off needle.
LT with the back stitch purled Cross the second stitch behind the first and purl it; knit the first stitch; take both stitches off needle.

Chart

Once you’ve got your basic chart, you can play around with variations. The simplest variant I came up with is to put a purl column in between every pair of columns with a twist, like this:

The result is the left-hand swatch shown in this photo:

P5022295

peace twist 1
Round 1: k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1
Round 2: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 3: k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 4: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 5: RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1
Round 6: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 7: k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1
Round 8: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 9: RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1
Round 10: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 11: RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1
Round 12: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 13: RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1
Round 14: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 15: k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 16: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 17: RT, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1
Round 18: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1
Round 19: k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1, RT, p1, k2, p1
Round 20: k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1

On the right is the beginning of more complicated playing around. I declared to myself that the coded crosses would mean anywhere that a knit stitch crossed over a knit stitch; otherwise I could place a knit stitch crossing a purl stitch anywhere I pleased, including on return rows.

Chart: peace twist 2
Round 1: k1, p1, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p1, k1
Round 2: k1, p1, k1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, k1, p1, k1
Round 3: k1, RT with back stitch purled, p1, RT, p1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, p1, RT, p1, LT with back stitch purled, k1
Round 4: k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2
Round 5: RT, p1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, p1, RT, p1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, p1, RT
Round 6: k1, LT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, RT with back stitch purled, k1
Round 7: k1, p1, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p1, k1
Round 8: k1, RT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, LT with back stitch purled, k1
Round 9: RT, p1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, p1, RT, p1, LT with back stitch purled, RT with back stitch purled, p1, RT
Round 10: k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2
Round 11: RT, p2, k2, p2, RT, p2, k2, p2, RT
Round 12: k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2
Round 13: RT, p2, k2, p2, RT, p2, k2, p2, RT
Round 14: k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2
Round 15: k2, p2, RT, p2, k2, p2, RT, p2, k2
Round 16: k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2
Round 17: RT, p1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, p1, RT, p1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, p1, RT
Round 18: k1, LT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, RT with back stitch purled, LT with back stitch purled, k1, p2, k1, RT with back stitch purled, k1
Round 19: k1, p1, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p2, LT, p1, k1
Round 20: k1, p1, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p1, k1

Next post in series: Other ways of making knitting codes

(If you’d rather comment on Ravelry, I have a thread for this post in my group.)

Sycamore stitch

I recently knit slippers for my son with a cable from my Mon Tricot stitch dictionary, Sycamore Stitch. I’m not going to write up the pattern, but I thought I could at least chart the stitch pattern for people; the written instructions are my own, not a direct copy from the original. Nobody has tested these for me; please let me know if you have problems!

Sycamore slippers

Key:

Right Side: knit; Wrong Side: purl
RS: purl; WS: knit
RS: slip 1 with yarn in back; WS: slip 1 with yarn in front
Slip 1 as if to knit onto cable needle, then the next as if to knit. Bring cable needle to front. Purl 2. Yarn over. Slip the stitches from the cable needle and knit them together through back loop. (Left leaning decrease.)
Slip 2 onto cable needle and let fall to back. Knit 2 together, yarn over. Slip the stitches back from the cable needle; purl 2.
RS: purl through back loop; WS: knit through back loop (results in twisted stitch)

Written instructions for flat knitting:

1: purl 1, knit 2, purl 4, knit 2, purl 1
2: knit 1, purl 2, knit 4, purl 2, knit 1
3: p1, k2, p4, k2, p1
4: k1, p2, k4, p2, k1
5: p1, k2, p4, k2, p1
6: k1, slip 2 with yarn in front, k4, slip 2 with yarn in front, k1
7: p1, slip 1 as if to knit onto cable needle, then the next as if to knit. Bring cable needle to front. P2. Yarn over. Slip the stitches from the cable needle and knit them together through back loop. (Left leaning decrease.) Slip 2 onto cable needle and let fall to back. Knit 2 together, yarn over. Slip the stitches back from the cable needle; p3.
8: k1, p2, k1 through back loop, k2, k1 through back loop, p2, k1