Pattern announcement! The Ellerbe Creek set is now complete.

Ellerbe HatEllerbe mittsphotos copyright Kathryn Wall

Announcing my Ellerbe hat!

The cornflower design I used for my Ellerbe mitts makes another appearance here, creating a larger flower or snowflake shown to best advantage on the back of a top-down slouchy hat. The flowers can be worked in the same yarn as the body (which looks subtle in a solid color, and can be striking in a multicolored yarn) or can be worked in yarn that contrasts in color or texture. (There is no embroidery – it just looks like it.)

A purchase of either of my Ellerbe patterns on the Ravelry website (don’t use the buy now button on this page) means a US$2 discount on buying the other. Discount is automatically applied at checkout.

Ellerbe Creek runs through Durham, North Carolina. I love going for walks by the creek and will donate ten percent of my proceeds from this hat to the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association.

<a href=”http://www.ravelry.com/purchase/gannet-designs/299546″><img src=”http://www.ravelry.com/images/shopping/buy-now.gif&#8221; border=”0″/></a>

If you’re on Ravelry, please join me for a knitalong on my group – if you finish either the hat or the mitts by the end of November, there will be prizes! Knitalong signup and details here.

Size:

  • To fit head sizes 18 (20, 22) inches [46 (51, 56) cm].
  • Brim measures 16 (18, 20) inches [40.5 (46, 51) cm] just above ribbing.
  • You can also increase to the desired diameter (about 2 inches [5cm] less than head size) and work from there, making it easy to adapt this to other yarns or head sizes, or to a beanie.

Gauge:

  • 18 stitches and 26 rounds over 4 inches [10cm] in stockinette on larger needles.

Materials needed:

  • 137 (177, 220) yards [125.5 (162, 201.5) m] of main color worsted weight yarn. Sample is worked in Quince & Co. Lark.
  • 8 yards [7.5m] of contrast color worsted weight yarn (or extra of main color). Sample uses Berocco Ultra Alpaca.
  • US size 8 [5mm] needles for working in the round.
  • US size 7 [4.5mm] needles for ribbing in the round.
  • cable needle (optional)
  • darning needle for working in ends.

Techniques:

  • You need to know how to cast on, bind off, knit, purl, yarn over, slip stitches, cable, increase, decrease, and knit in the round.
  • Both written instructions and a chart are provided.

Thank you!

Pattern Release: Onward top-down hat recipe

Onward: a top-down hat recipe with the word Onward encoded in the stitch pattern.

There are days when I need to acknowledge unpleasantness, but keep moving forward. On those days, my motto is onward. I made this hat as a tactile reminder to myself for those days.

I took the letters of onward, encoded them as numbers, and then charted those numbers, using my methods for encoding words as patterns. The marked squares were turned into purl stitches, and thus I made this stitch pattern.

This is a top-down hat. It can be ended when the yarn does if necessary; the pattern has sufficient purls in it that it doesn’t curl. A shorter hat will be a cap; a longer one can cover the ears for warmth; an even longer one can be slouchy. Knit the crown and some ribbing in a contrast color if desired. I have seen this hat worked to good effect in solid yarn, tonal yarn, variegated, and self-striping. Gradient would also be fun!

US$5

Onward Ravelry page

Continue reading

Spindle Hat: Katherine Whorl

Announcing the Katherine Whorl spindle hat pattern!

knittingphotos18

This pattern is included in the Indie Design Gift-A-Long until the end of 2013. Have a look at the Indie Design Gift-A-Long to join in the fun!

Many spindle whorls are decorated with little circles, and so this hat is covered with many circles created by crocheting the traditional Catherine’s Wheel stitch pattern and then outlining the circles with chain stitch. The hat name is a bit of a pun on the traditional stitch pattern name: whorl because of spindles; Katherine in honor of the five women named that in my knitting group who all spell it with a K.

I wanted to combine several of the crafts that use yarn, so I embroidered my circles and knitted the brim (instructions for an alternate crochet brim are provided). Use surface crochet to create much the same effect as the embroidery.

I’ve found that crocheting with a single strand of yarn and knitting with the same yarn doubled makes the two match up well in terms of both stitch gauge and appearance. I made use of that principle in this hat.

This pattern is intended for confident crocheters. No in-depth tutorials are provided.

Giftalong!

Well, this is something I didn’t expect to happen – the idea sprang up among a bunch of independent designers about ten days ago, and suddenly we’re having a gift-a-long.

What is a gift-a-long? In this case, it’s a large group of people knitting or crocheting gifts  from a select group of patterns by independent designers. There’s a Ravelry group: Indie Design Gift-a-Long, where people are discussing their work and getting to know each other. There are prizes and there will be games. It’s a lot of fun!

The gift-a-long will extend through the end of the year. Our gift to you as designers is a 25% discount on all participating patterns that lasts through November 15 (just use the coupon code giftalong before you pay for patterns).

There are thousands of patterns available, listed both in a Ravelry thread and a group of Pinterest boards. There are links to everything from the group’s information pages on Ravelry.

My six available paid patterns are all included in the sale:

Giftalong

I’ve started out by knitting Leethal’s Wild is the Wind, a top-down hat. (Is anyone surprised? No? Good.)

Here’s my progress so far (click for a bigger picture):

wildisthewindI’ve been delighted both by how the pattern is written and how it’s coming out. It seems that Leethal’s style suits my thought processes.

Having a great time, wish you were here!

Whorled spindle hat

knittingphotos15So my friend Sarah Sipe and I have been designing hats inspired by spindle whorls. She designed one that was more broadly inspired, and it’s in today’s KnittySpin! Lots of spindles have circles, stripes, chevrons, or zigzags. This one has all of them and is a lot of fun to knit. I like that it’s top down. I like that the top is based on the pi shawl increases rather than the kind of increases I use. (I like them both, but they look very different.) I knit two samples for her; one is the commercial yarn hat that’s on the official page. The one above is knit in Mountain Meadow Wool Cody.

So much fun!

Pinion hat pattern, reintroduced!

I’ve just posted an edited version of another pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

The text is much the same. I’m in the process of reformatting all my patterns to be consistent with each other. In the case of Pinion, I’ve also updated the chart from the old Excel chart to a professionally-done chart using StitchMastery.


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together,  make a yarn over, and bind off, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now. More information is available on the pattern’s page on Ravelry.

Thank you!

Pinion, redux

I posted this pattern last year, and will be donating any proceeds from December 2010 to help a friend’s friend and his family make it through a personal disaster: he was caught in random violence and needs reconstructive surgery.

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

If you have a Ravelry account, here’s the pattern page for Pinion.

Thank you!

Pinion hat pattern!

I’ve just posted a new pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

I will donate all proceeds for Haiti Relief (after PayPal fees are deducted) from sales of this pattern through the last day of February. Money will be split evenly between Doctors Without Borders/MSF, Partners in Health, and the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund. Thank you very much for your help!


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

Thank you!