Pinion hat pattern, reintroduced!

I’ve just posted an edited version of another pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

The text is much the same. I’m in the process of reformatting all my patterns to be consistent with each other. In the case of Pinion, I’ve also updated the chart from the old Excel chart to a professionally-done chart using StitchMastery.


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together,  make a yarn over, and bind off, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now. More information is available on the pattern’s page on Ravelry.

Thank you!

Ellerbe Mitts

You might have noticed that it’s a new year. So did I. Anyway, I’ve decided to start selling my designs again this year, and so here I am with my Ellerbe Mitts pattern.

Green fingerless mitts
Warm mitts, suitable for handspun or commercial yarn.

Ellerbe Creek runs near where I live in Durham, North Carolina. I love going for walks by the creek and will donate ten percent of my proceeds from these mitts to the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association.

The mitts are knit from the top down (from fingers to wrist). Most of the knitting is plain stockinette, with a motif from Barbara Walker’s Second Treasury: Cornflower stitch. The motif makes a vertical stripe down the back of the hand and also decorates the thumb gusset. It resembles embroidery, but is actually elongated stitches pulled over the surface of the knitting. To enhance the effect, I recommend solid colored yarn, variegated yarn, or deliberately creating stripes using multiple different yarns.

Sizes:

Medium: hand portion is 7.2 inches (18.25cm) around and the cuff is 6.5 inches (16.25cm).
Large: hand portion is 8 inches (20.32cm) around and the cuff is 7.2 inches (18.25cm)
For this project, I would recommend treating the first mitt as a swatch; if it doesn’t work out, it’s not all that much knitting to redo it.

Materials needed:

~50 yards of DK (or light worsted weight yarn). I used handspun yarn to design the mitts.
Size 7 needles (double points or circulars, depending on your preferred method) or the correct size to achieve gauge; also a spare knitting needle of similar size (it doesn’t have to match).
Two cable needles or two pieces of scrap yarn. (optional)
A little bit of smooth waste yarn
Techniques:

You need to know how to cast on, bind off, knit, purl, yarn over, slip stitches, decrease, and knit in the round. The instructions are not written for any particular method of knitting in the round – you choose how to arrange the stitches for double pointed needles, Magic Loop, or two circulars. I provide both written instructions and a chart for the stitch pattern.

New Pattern: Paper Snowflake

I love cutting paper snowflakes, with twelve folds and six symmetrical points. This knitted snowflake looks very much like one of my paper ones.

Knit these from the center out in cotton, linen, or hemp and then starch to use as ornaments. Knit in any fiber and use as appliqués. Good for using up leftovers from other projects.

For experienced or confident knitters. None of the techniques used are particularly difficult on their own, but the combination of some of them is a little finicky.

Yarn:
8-10 yards of laceweight on size 0 needles; about 19 yards of worsted on size 8 needles.

Techniques used:

  • casting on for the center of a doily
  • knitted cast on
  • multiple yarn-overs in a row
  • knitting through the back loop
  • knit two together
  • bind off (knit two, pass one stitch over)

You could easily use Magic Loop or 2 circulars; I used double-points. The pattern is needle agnostic.

Pinion, redux

I posted this pattern last year, and will be donating any proceeds from December 2010 to help a friend’s friend and his family make it through a personal disaster: he was caught in random violence and needs reconstructive surgery.

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

If you have a Ravelry account, here’s the pattern page for Pinion.

Thank you!

Pinion hat pattern!

I’ve just posted a new pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

I will donate all proceeds for Haiti Relief (after PayPal fees are deducted) from sales of this pattern through the last day of February. Money will be split evenly between Doctors Without Borders/MSF, Partners in Health, and the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund. Thank you very much for your help!


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

Thank you!