Tag Archives: knitting

Nest: a mosaic knitting chart

Earlier, I encoded the word Nest and made it into a lace stitch pattern and a needlework chart. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts and instructions

Nest: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Nest from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Kate and Pia, two of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Nest: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Nest, suggested by Kate and Pia, two Patreon supporters.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Idyll: a mosaic knitting chart

A while back, I encoded the word idyll and made it into a lace stitch pattern and a needlework chart. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts and instructions

meta Knit: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Knit from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Nim, one of my Patreon supporters. I was pleased that this option came out with motifs that are common in traditional needlewrok.

In my opinion, this pattern looks good as both an allover design and as a border strip; there’s an example of the latter at the end of this post.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

meta Knit: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Knit, suggested by Nim, a Patreon supporter. It’s funny to have a stitch pattern named knit, but also a little confusing. I’ve called the blog post meta knit because it’s a self-referential name. This isn’t the first time I’ve used the meta label; I’ve also got meta lace. Alas, while they both have a 10 stitch repeat, they don’t line up well. There might be a way to tweak that; perhaps I’ll see if I can figure it out.

I don’t usually use purl stitches on the right side, but they really helped outline a shape that I like a lot. Also, I promise I didn’t go out of my way to find a stitch layout that would work best with bunny ears yarnovers, but here we are regardless!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Leafy Blocks: a lace knitting stitch pattern

I’ve been making a series of stitch patterns using the Bunny Ears Yarnover I unvented. I’m sharing all of them, even the ones I don’t like as much, to demonstrate that it’s okay to make things you don’t think are perfect. I’ve learned things from all of the swatches I’ve knit so far using the technique, and someone might like the ones I don’t. (After all, we all have different taste.)

I was intrigued by the curvy shape that the bunny ears yarnover made, and thought it might look good as the bottom of a small leaf shape. In the end, I’m not really satisfied with this, but there’s nothing really wrong with it. I just don’t like the way it looks: I think it’s clunky.

It did, however, give me an idea… stay tuned until next week!

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and instructions

Water: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Water from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Amy G, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Water: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Water, suggested by Amy G., a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Train tracks: a knitting stitch pattern

I’ve been making a series of stitch patterns using the Bunny Ears Yarnover I unvented. I’m sharing all of them, even the ones I don’t like as much, to demonstrate that it’s okay to make things you don’t think are perfect. I’ve learned things from all of the swatches I’ve knit so far using the technique, and someone might like the ones I don’t. (After all, we all have different taste.)

The first few I liked quite a bit. This one doesn’t excite me, but it’s fine. Furthermore, it might look great combined with other stitch patterns. One thing I do like about this one is structural: it’s not ribbing, but it acts enough like ribbing that I think it wouldn’t curl.

Another thing I like is that it would be very easy to adjust the width of the repeat by adding or subtracting knit stitches between the bunny ears yarnovers.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and instructions