Tag Archives: lace

Osprey: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Osprey, suggested by Enting and Bookwyrm, two of my Patreon supporters.

I’ve already made a stitch pattern with the leaf motif that shows up in Osprey; it doesn’t quite match up in terms of the stitch repeat, but Cariad Leaf could be modified to suit, I think. Also, I *think* Osprey and Cariad could maybe work in the same design? I’d have to chart it out to be sure, but it’s worth a try.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made an Osprey needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Peach: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Peach, suggested by Cathy D, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Peach needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Verve: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Verve, suggested by Kate, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Verve needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Weave: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Weave, suggested by Catnach, a Patreon supporter. Occasionally the words I encode make me giggle for one reason or another. In this case, it’s the incongruity between the word weave, and the format of the stitch pattern I’m designing (which is knitting).

I don’t usually include a side view of my swatches, but I was having trouble conveying what I like most about this lace any other way, so the featured photo is one view and the flat view is above the chart because it’s easier to see how it works.

Anyway, I’ll be posting an extra blog post with some actual weaving options for Weave later this week. (How could I not?)

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Weave needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Fibre: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Fibre, suggested by Nim, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Fibre needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Dusk: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Dusk, suggested by Catnach and Smart Mouth’d, two Patreon supporters. It’s one of my favorite times of day, especially when it’s summer, as it is where I live.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Dusk needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Kitten: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Kitten, suggested by Susan C, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a Kitten needlework chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Sunrise: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Sunrise, suggested by Emma, a Patreon supporter. Apparently after making a lace design with only single yarnovers and single decreases, I had to make a stitch pattern that uses most of the unusual lace techniques in my repertoire. I’d apologize, but it was a lot of fun!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a needlework chart from Sunrise for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

How: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is How, suggested by Enting a Patreon supporter. This is “how” as in “how is it May already?”

This ended up being one of my rare code lace designs with only simple yarnovers and decreases. It does have knitting through the back loop in the next right side row to tighten up the stitches above the yarnovers (this is a trick I learned from Dorothy Reade’s work), because I felt it improved the look of this particular lace. Ordinarily I like them looser as I feel it gives a more complex, organic look to my lace.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also made a How chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Xeric: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Xeric, suggested by Susan C and Bookwyrm, Patreon supporters. I noticed a while back that the letter X was the only initial letter not yet represented in the words encoded for my blog, and challenged my supporters to suggest words starting with X until the random number generator picked one. And finally, here we are. (There’s a bunch of other good words starting with X in the pool of past suggested words that I call my word hoard; some of them might appear in future too.)

Xeric means characterized by, or adapted to an extremely dry habitat. If you’ve ever encountered the word xeriscaping, it’s from the same Greek root. A good word!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions