Tag Archives: lace

Nest: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Nest, suggested by Kate and Pia, two Patreon supporters.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

meta Knit: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Knit, suggested by Nim, a Patreon supporter. It’s funny to have a stitch pattern named knit, but also a little confusing. I’ve called the blog post meta knit because it’s a self-referential name. This isn’t the first time I’ve used the meta label; I’ve also got meta lace. Alas, while they both have a 10 stitch repeat, they don’t line up well. There might be a way to tweak that; perhaps I’ll see if I can figure it out.

I don’t usually use purl stitches on the right side, but they really helped outline a shape that I like a lot. Also, I promise I didn’t go out of my way to find a stitch layout that would work best with bunny ears yarnovers, but here we are regardless!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Leafy Columns: two lace knitting stitch patterns

Last week, I posted Leafy Blocks, and remarked that it inspired something I preferred. Here is Leafy Columns (versions 1 & 2), which is like a compressed version of Leafy Blocks. I think these work much better: they have cleaner lines and they look less blobby. I think it’s more interesting and attractive.

I’m not looking for affirmation here; I’m confident about the quality of my designs. I have two points that I’m trying to make with these recent blog posts:

  1. Personal taste is subjective, and it’s okay to like different things. Though my original planned point was
  2. part of the process of making things is to make mistakes and try things that it turns out you might not like personally. Imperfection is part of the creative process. I’m going to link again to a post from Tien Chu that expands upon this.
    I’m sharing the results of these experiments that I don’t like because I feel like it’s easy to look at designers and bloggers and Instagrammers and so on who only share the things that satisfy them, and think that all their things are perfect, and then feel that if your own work isn’t perfect, there’s something flawed about you. But really it’s just that they don’t ever share their imperfect work.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and written instructions

Leafy Blocks: a lace knitting stitch pattern

I’ve been making a series of stitch patterns using the Bunny Ears Yarnover I unvented. I’m sharing all of them, even the ones I don’t like as much, to demonstrate that it’s okay to make things you don’t think are perfect. I’ve learned things from all of the swatches I’ve knit so far using the technique, and someone might like the ones I don’t. (After all, we all have different taste.)

I was intrigued by the curvy shape that the bunny ears yarnover made, and thought it might look good as the bottom of a small leaf shape. In the end, I’m not really satisfied with this, but there’s nothing really wrong with it. I just don’t like the way it looks: I think it’s clunky.

It did, however, give me an idea… stay tuned until next week!

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and instructions

Water: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Water, suggested by Amy G., a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Train tracks: a knitting stitch pattern

I’ve been making a series of stitch patterns using the Bunny Ears Yarnover I unvented. I’m sharing all of them, even the ones I don’t like as much, to demonstrate that it’s okay to make things you don’t think are perfect. I’ve learned things from all of the swatches I’ve knit so far using the technique, and someone might like the ones I don’t. (After all, we all have different taste.)

The first few I liked quite a bit. This one doesn’t excite me, but it’s fine. Furthermore, it might look great combined with other stitch patterns. One thing I do like about this one is structural: it’s not ribbing, but it acts enough like ribbing that I think it wouldn’t curl.

Another thing I like is that it would be very easy to adjust the width of the repeat by adding or subtracting knit stitches between the bunny ears yarnovers.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Follow link for charts and instructions

Idyll: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Idyll, suggested by Kate, a Patreon supporter. I think we could all use an idyll right about now. Peace, and rest, and beautiful surroundings. Or at least, that’s how I’ve always thought of idylls.

I decided to look it up, and it turns out that an idyll is a poem or song that describes a peaceful episode in the countryside, often idealized and unrealistic. A romanticized view of country life, in other words. Ah, well. A peaceful episode in the country still sounds comforting right now.

To return to knitting, I can’t tell if I’m just currently obsessed with the bunny ears yarnover, but I think it’s going to be useful in a fair number of code lace layouts that I would otherwise have decided were impossible. I’m using it enough that I’ve started to abbreviate it instead of writing it out in the instructions. Also, this design introduces the alternate form that’s based on bunny ears back, because of the way the decrease lines need to go. Both forms are there, so watch the chart symbols and abbreviations carefully!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Scattered Tulips: a knitted stitch pattern

This is the first of the stitch pattern ideas I mentioned in the blog post about Bunny Ears yarnovers. It’s the first one I tried, and I like it a lot. It’s a classic layout for motifs, so I figured it would probably look good, but I wasn’t sure how it would look with lots of plain stockinette as the background.

Thanks go to my twitter followers for helping me come up with the name. There were a lot of ideas, but the vast majority of people saw tulips in it, so here we are.

Posts in this series of stitch patterns based on Bunny Ears Yarnover

Continue reading Scattered Tulips: a knitted stitch pattern

Icicle: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Icicle, suggested by Cathy, a Patreon supporter. I like all my code lace, but I like some results better than others. This one makes me very happy indeed!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Spark: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is spark, suggested by Bonnie C, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions