Song: a mosaic knitting chart

sample image for Song: a mosaic knitting chart, by Naomi Parkhurst

Last week, I encoded the word Song and made it into a lace stitch pattern and a needlework chart. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts

Zephyr: a mosaic knitting chart

sample image for Zephyr: a mosaic knitting chart, by Naomi Parkhurst

A while back, I encoded the word Zephyr and made it into a lace stitch pattern. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts

Stairsteps: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern

sample image for Stairsteps: a mosaic knitting chart, by Naomi Parkhurst

I was looking at an encoded word mosaic stitch pattern I was debating posting this morning. While I’m not going to post that one, it gave me the idea for this one. (This one is not encoded; it’s just an abstract pattern I like.) This is the kind of design that I came up with on my own that feels like something that other people probably came up with on their own, too. Sometimes designing is like that! =

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts

Beaded: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern

sample for Beaded: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

Last week, I encoded the word Beaded and made it into a lace stitch pattern. For this week’s post, I reworked a code grid I made while planning that post and turned it into a mosaic knitting stitch pattern. (I used the process described in this post.)

I haven’t been including text instructions for mosaic charts for a while, but I think I should, so I will from now on.

A nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting, so I’m not going to provide a swatch this time. Mosaic knitting looks difficult, but it’s not as hard as it looks! Basically, knit two-row stripes, and slip stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern. If you can knit stripes, you can knit mosaic patterns.

Here’s a detailed blog post I wrote about how it works.

Follow the link for charts