Wish: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern

Wish: a mosaic knitting stitch pattern

Yesterday’s needlework chart for Wish turns out to work quite well as the basis for a mosaic knitting chart. I ran out of time to knit a swatch, but the nice thing about mosaic knitting is that the charts are similar to the final appearance of the knitting.

The thing about mosaic knitting is that it just looks difficult. It’s really easy to do! Basically, you’re knitting two row stripes, and slipping stitches from the row below to make the contrasting pattern. If you can knit stripes, you can knit mosaic patterns.

Here’s an article from Twist Collective about how it works.

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Unicorn: a free needlework pattern for any craft

Unicorn: a free needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

This month, the random number generator chose unicorn, suggested by Katherine & Ange on Patreon.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. I use a bunch of filters and things to try to make it look interesting while retaining the encoded layout. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it.

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Blossom: a free needlework chart for any craft

Blossom: a free needlework design for any craft

This month, the random number generator chose blossom, suggested by Rebecca & Amy on Patreon.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. I use a bunch of filters and things to try to make it look interesting while retaining the encoded layout. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it.

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Two things: another texture post and a Patreon thing

Mountain: a knit-purl stitch pattern based on encoding the word as numbers.

I’ve been watching the numbers on my next Patreon goal with excitement – if I can get up to $75 a month income, I’m going to start making a second stitch pattern from my Patreon words each month. If you can support me at a dollar a month, you can help make this happen! Only thirteen dollars to go. (And I have some ideas percolating for some new goals after that which I think you’ll like.) Here is my Patreon page.

I talked a couple of weeks ago about wanting to share more swatches of the kinds of stitch patterns my needlework charts can be turned into. The swatch I’ve posted today is the result of taking the Mountain needlework chart, turning it sideways, and making a k/p stitch pattern from it. Each black square is purled on the right side and knit on the wrong side, and each white square is knit on the right side and purled on the wrong side.

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Hedgehog: a free needlework chart for any craft

Hedgehog: a free needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

This month, the random number generator chose hedgehog, suggested by Hazel on Patreon. I like hedgehogs very much.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. I use a bunch of filters and things to try to make it look interesting while retaining the encoded layout. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it.

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Texture and code charts, part 1

Three possible ways to knit up the Frost needlework chart

I focus a lot more on encoded lace patterns than anything else, because I’ve always felt that that they take more personal creativity. I don’t do fancy cables like Autumn so much because a lot of the code grids just aren’t suitable for them. And I figured someone would be happy to turn the needlework charts into regular stitch patterns.

I do find myself a bit wistful, though, because I think people haven’t really seen the possibilities in the needlework charts. I think this is mostly on me, though. I haven’t generally had time to make a swatch to go with the chart at the beginning of each month, but I think I’ll post a series of swatches to demonstrate some things to do with them, using older charts. I hope this will inspire someone!

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Bonifate: a free needlework chart for any craft

Bonifate: a free needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

This month, the random number generator chose bonifate, suggested by Ange on Patreon. According to my Oxford English Dictionary Bonifate is an obsolete (but very cool) word meaning “lucky, fortunate, well-fated”. Its derivation from Latin is pretty straightforward: boni- for good, and fate for fortune or fate.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object, but I just want to give a sense of it.

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Mountain: a free needlework chart for any craft

Mountain: a needlework chart for any craft

The word of the month is mountain, suggested by Lara on Patreon.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object, but I just want to give a sense of it.

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Dragons: a free chart for any craft that uses them

The word of the month is Dragons, suggested by Nyriis and Asimina on Patreon.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide an image of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a chart, but I just want to give a sense of it. This month’s is fake cross stitch because I think the floats would be too long if this were worked as stranded knitting.

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