Tag Archives: patreon

Drizzle: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Drizzle from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Brenda D., one of my Patreon supporters.

I tried to pick rainy colors for the sample illustration, but I couldn’t resist sneaking in some sunny yellow dots to perk things up a little.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Drizzle: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Drizzle, suggested by Brenda D., a Patreon supporter who remarks that it drizzles a lot in Wales, where she lives. Sometimes I’m in the mood for drizzle; sometimes I’m not. It can be really beautiful at times. I see clouds in this lace, which is apt, but accidental.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Kangaroo: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Kangaroo from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Andria, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Kangaroo: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Kangaroo, suggested by Andria, a Patreon supporter. I’m pretty pleased by this, though I did notice one change I’d want to make in the decreases after I finished the sample and ran out of time. (It happens! See the bottom for errata.)

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Jump: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Jump from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Cathy D, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

I think this chart in particular would work well as a knit-purl pattern: replace the dark squares with purl symbols.

Follow link for charts and more information

Jump: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Jump, suggested by Cathy D., a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Nest: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Nest from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Kate and Pia, two of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Nest: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Nest, suggested by Kate and Pia, two Patreon supporters.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

meta Knit: a needlework chart for any craft

The random number generator picked Knit from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Nim, one of my Patreon supporters. I was pleased that this option came out with motifs that are common in traditional needlewrok.

In my opinion, this pattern looks good as both an allover design and as a border strip; there’s an example of the latter at the end of this post.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

meta Knit: a lace knitting stitch pattern

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is Knit, suggested by Nim, a Patreon supporter. It’s funny to have a stitch pattern named knit, but also a little confusing. I’ve called the blog post meta knit because it’s a self-referential name. This isn’t the first time I’ve used the meta label; I’ve also got meta lace. Alas, while they both have a 10 stitch repeat, they don’t line up well. There might be a way to tweak that; perhaps I’ll see if I can figure it out.

I don’t usually use purl stitches on the right side, but they really helped outline a shape that I like a lot. Also, I promise I didn’t go out of my way to find a stitch layout that would work best with bunny ears yarnovers, but here we are regardless!

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions