Mourn: a needlework chart for any craft

sample image for Mourn: a needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

I encoded Mourn as lace last week as a memorial for those who have died because of COVID-19, though it of course has wider uses. This is meant as a border pattern.

I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Iris: a needlework chart for any craft

example image for Iris: a needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

The random number generator picked Iris from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Pia, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Iris: a lace knitting stitch pattern

sample knitting for Iris: a lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The second word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon last month is Iris, suggested by Pia, a Patreon supporter.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Blue: a needlework chart for any craft

sample image for Blue: a needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

The random number generator picked Blue from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Bookwyrm, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Blue: a lace knitting stitch pattern

sample lace for Blue: a lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The first word I drew from the words suggested on Patreon this month is Blue, suggested by Bookwyrm, a Patreon supporter. I absent-mindedly used the same wheat-colored yarn I’ve been using a lot for my lace swatches recently, and then I thought about recoloring the photo, and then I decided that no, I’d leave it alone. It can be like that thing from the Exploratorium Museum where they print the names of colors in colors that don’t match the colors being named.

Also, here’s my lace for the word green.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Sea: a needlework chart for any craft

sample image for Sea: a needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

The random number generator picked Sea from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Nim, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information

Sea: a lace knitting stitch pattern

sample knitting for Sea: a lace knitting stitch pattern, by Naomi Parkhurst

The word I drew from my word hoard for this stitch pattern is sea, suggested by Nim, a Patreon supporter. I often especially love the way the lace I make from shorter words works out, and this is no exception. I’m very pleased with this one.

Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. I make three of these into knitting stitches each month: the second and third (posted on the first day of the next month) are drawn from the collection of new words; the first is drawn from the collection of unused words. A random number generator helps me choose these, and then I get to work, first turning the letters into numbers, then charting the numbers onto grids in various ways. Finally, when I make the chart into lace, I turn the marked squares into yarnovers and work out where to place the corresponding decreases. (I usually make lace; occasionally I make cables instead.) I also make a chart for any craft that uses a square grid for designing; this goes in a separate post.

The stitch patterns are not meant in any way to look like the original words; the words are the seeds of my creativity.

Follow link for charts and instructions

Syzygy: a needlework chart for any craft

sample image for Syzygy: a needlework chart for any craft, by Naomi Parkhurst

The random number generator picked Syzygy from the suggestions for this post, suggested by Jacque, one of my Patreon supporters.

I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever. I also try to provide at least some digital art of the pattern repeated all over not as a chart. It doesn’t necessarily look like a finished object for any particular craft, but I just want to give a sense of it in use. (I try to make it look like knitting when it’s got floats short enough for easy stranded knitting.)

Follow link for charts and more information