Designs using my stitch patterns

It occurs to me to mention that I have a bundle on Ravelry that lists all the patterns I know of that use my stitch patterns: Naomi’s stitch patterns in use. So far, it’s just nine patterns, but I know of four more that will be coming in the next few months.

If you have a Ravelry account, you can click the “add to favorites” button on the bundle to find it easily in the future.

Here’s a screenshot of what you’ll find right now (see bundle for working links):

screenshot of patterns currently in pattern bundle

 

Celebrating the end of my pattern hiatus!

I’m feeling pretty happy about getting my patterns in better order, and I’d like to share a little bit of that happiness with you. For the next month, I’m offering a coupon good for $1 off any of my patterns on Ravelry. And yes, that means you can get the Paper Snowflake for free.

The three patterns the coupon is good for include Ellerbe Mitts, Paper Snowflake, and Pinion.

I hope to start a knitalong sometime soon. Keep an eye out on my Google+ page or on my Ravelry group to find out more.

ETA: It would help if I provided the coupon code, wouldn’t it? Put this code in when you’re checking out: StringGeekery

Pinion hat pattern, reintroduced!

I’ve just posted an edited version of another pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

The text is much the same. I’m in the process of reformatting all my patterns to be consistent with each other. In the case of Pinion, I’ve also updated the chart from the old Excel chart to a professionally-done chart using StitchMastery.


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together,  make a yarn over, and bind off, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now. More information is available on the pattern’s page on Ravelry.

Thank you!

Pinion, redux

I posted this pattern last year, and will be donating any proceeds from December 2010 to help a friend’s friend and his family make it through a personal disaster: he was caught in random violence and needs reconstructive surgery.

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

If you have a Ravelry account, here’s the pattern page for Pinion.

Thank you!

Pinion hat pattern!

I’ve just posted a new pattern on Ravelry, the Pinion tam:

Pinion Tam blocked on a plate

I will donate all proceeds for Haiti Relief (after PayPal fees are deducted) from sales of this pattern through the last day of February. Money will be split evenly between Doctors Without Borders/MSF, Partners in Health, and the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund. Thank you very much for your help!


This lacy tam is worked from the center outwards. The design spirals outward and flows into a ribbed brim. It looks more complicated than it is–if you know how to knit in the round, purl, knit two together, knit three together, and make a yarn over, you can make this hat.

Both charts and written out instructions (in abbreviations) are provided, along with suggestions for modifying the brim size to fit.

Other materials required include a darning needle for working in ends, about a yard of smooth, thin yarn for making a lifeline, and a plate for blocking (about 10 inches or 25cm in diameter).

You shouldn’t need a Ravelry account to buy now.

Thank you!

Bull City Yarn Bag

I’ve put up my first pattern for sale on Ravelry:

The Bull City Yarn Bag!

It’s meant to let someone carry a ball of yarn or some handspinning fiber hanging from the wrist – excellent for portable projects! It’s about five inches tall and five inches deep.

Techniques you need to know include
– Knit, purl, slip, yarn-overs and decreases
– Provisional cast-on
– Knitting in the round
– Three-needle bind-off
– I-cord
– Kitchener stitch (a tiny amount)

I will be donating all proceeds for Haiti relief through the end of March. The pattern costs $3. Funds will be split evenly between Doctors Without Borders/MSF, Partners in Health, and the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund. Thank you very much for your help!

New geekery in progress

Somehow I ended up starting a new group on Ravelry: Textile Texts, for discussions, reviews, and lists of books having to do with the technical aspects or history of textiles.

So far we’ve just started up by setting up topics for book lists, but we’ll also be discussing a book a month (like a book club) and I hope people will post reviews of random books or journal articles as they find them.

If it gets off the ground, I think it’s going to be pretty nifty. Not to mention geeky.

And it’s led to me finding this nifty website: On-Line Digital Archive of Documents on Weaving and Related Topics …just going there to get the link got me started browsing. What a resource it is! Most of the texts are not in copyright anymore; some of them have been posted by permission of the author or the publisher. Amazing stuff.