Groundhog: a free chart for any craft

Each month when I make a knitting stitch pattern for my Patreon supporters, I also make a chart that should work for any craft that uses square grids for design: cross stitch, needlepoint, crochet, quilting, etc. This chart was generated by turning the letters of a suggested word (in this case groundhog) into numbers, then using those numbers to generate charts in different ways until I find one I like. Here’s this month’s.

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Étude no. 5 – combining knitweaving with stranded knitting.

Etude no. 5 - combining knitweaving with stranded knitting.

Since learning about knitweaving, I’ve been curious about combining it with regular stranded knitting. All the projects I’ve seen have used one technique or the other (probably because knitweaving by itself can look better with doubled strands rather than single).

In this swatch I played around with two configurations. In the bottom section (variation 1), each column of dark stitches was worked using only one technique. The knitweaving sections therefore have little horizontal green bars while the stitches worked in dark green make a solid vertical stripe.

The upper section (variation 2) has the knitweaving and dark stitches worked out of phase with each other. This makes for a subtle knotted effect; the stitches worked in the natural color in those vertical lines disappear.

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Spring! (free stitch pattern)

Two stitch patterns based on the word, Spring.It has certainly been a while. I got sidetracked, and then I felt abashed, but now I have a backlog of things I’ve been meaning to write about. (The problem is never a shortage of material!)

Anyway, I’m in the midst of writing a stitch dictionary, among other things, and I was getting fed up with not being able to share any of the things I was doing. So I decided to make something that’s not going in the stitch dictionary and share it with you.

I used my secret code techniques to lay the word Spring out on several different grids, and ended up liking this one a lot. I made one lace design from it and also a stranded knitting chart. The stranded chart is mirrored vertically as well as horizontally. The lace one has an extra column down the middle and on each side; this avoids a double yarn over. I dote on double yarn overs, but I know that not everyone is comfortable with them.

Happy Spring!

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So many ways to make a hug!

This is my last post on encoding “Hug” in yarn. First I knitted lace, then I played with crochet, and now I’m going to finish up with some more knitting.

I discussed the mechanics of laying out this particular grid in the crochet post, but here it is one more time, stripped down a bit.

other hugs - 2 rows

As with the crochet, sometimes the stitches work better with patterning on every row, and sometimes they do well to have a plain row in between. (Compare it with the lace chart, and you’ll see that the yarn overs go in the dark squares.)

other hugs

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